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Merrak's Isometric Adventures -- Inventory

merrak

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I finally replaced the room system used in the original Temple of Idosra. In the original game, each room was a fixed 12x12x4 tiles size, which was the easiest to implement in a 10-day span. The new system lets me "paint" sectors.

Here is an example which duplicates the original game, with one exception.


The room one to the right of the lower-left corner has been split into two sectors, allowing the camera to move behind the wall. I made a little video showing some of the gameplay, including the split room (it has a staircase in it)

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/YxxSNgngjgw" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/YxxSNgngjgw</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YxxSNgngjgw

The sector map will let me design more intricate levels--the kind I really envisioned, like the one in this older post

I also made some updates to the UI. I'm not sure if I want to have no indication whatsoever of enemy HP and damage numbers, use just numbers, or keep the MUD-like text output that overlays the view.

Bombini

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  • Posts: 724

merrak

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  • Posts: 1242
Levels are coming along nicely :)

Tiled is a useful tool, but I'm still thinking that I'll need to make my own in-game editor in order to set up switches, doors, chests, and other interactive elements in the levels.

Attached are a couple of levels as they look in the editor and in-game. I'm also working on making some new tiles so that the rooms have more variety. I'm taking some inspiration from Frank Lloyd Wright's --A Fireproof House for $5,000--

merrak

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  • Posts: 1242
A couple of new additions--

The core functionality of the inventory system is complete, and I'm slowly adding object actions. One of the first items I made is an oil lamp you can use to look around in dark areas. Of course, you'll have to find oil. Here's a short video showing it all in action.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/edXXuo9v4lg" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/edXXuo9v4lg</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=edXXuo9v4lg

One thing I'd like to do is give the player the option to use objects in ways they weren't intended, such as throwing the (lit) oil lamp at a monster. The fireball would deliver a lot of damage--but destroy the lamp.

So this brings up the possibility of the player rendering the game unbeatable. I had the idea of determining the latest save point at which the game was still winnable, and resetting the player to that point (instead of the last save point) when they die.

One way to do that would be to make a graph of all the elements that are required to beat the game, and which ones depend on others. (e.g. you need the red key to open the door that hides the blue key). I can then run A* to determine if a "path" to the game's goal still exists.

For "Temple of Idosra", I can create this graph by hand. For a game using random dungeon generation, algorithms that use graphs (such as lock and keys) provide the necessities to figure out how far back the player will need to be sent.

merrak

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  • Posts: 1242
So far I'm finding the level design phase to be more challenging than I originally anticipated. The added flexibility to design levels in almost any way I want has been met with the challenge of doing so.

The constraints of the original Temple of Idosra forced me to make every room the same size and with exits to neighboring rooms in the same places (on the borders of the 12x12 grid).  On top of that, I had time constraints. When the hurricane struck and I had no power, I passed the time drawing rooms on paper. When power was restored I had too little time left in the game jam to make revisions to my plans.

KramerGames left some good advice over here about rough drafts of manuscripts and how to relate them to games. It's a nice reminder that you don't have to get everything right the first time, since it's not likely to happen anyway. I used to spend quite a bit of time over on the literature forums on DeviantART, and the usual advice given on writing was to just get something down first. You can't edit a manuscript that doesn't exist. So I decided just to start sketching areas and see where my imagination takes me.

Here's one I put together in a couple of days.



I'm pretty happy with how it looks in the actual game. The game has an adventure feeling with a number of puzzles--but depending on your play style, you can actually ignore many of them. It's heavily influenced by the types of areas in a MUD I used to operate.



An early puzzle that is somewhat optional is to figure out how to get the lamps to turn on. It's not difficult to solve--mainly just hunting down the pieces needed to restore a crude generator. It's a reward for exploring and the lights reveal passages that are totally hidden in the darkness--although you can find them early by stumbling around in the dark.



I took my eyes off the screen for one moment to push the "capture screenshot" button and died. Whoops. I took some steps to steer the player in the right direction at the beginning, and to get to this area I ignored them--so it's pretty tough. While I'm not using "experience points" as is the tradition in RPGs, you can find more powerful weapons and books that teach the player character new skills. Obviously she has some reading to do before reaching this room.

Irock

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  • Posts: 2812
Ahh, this is looking really sweet!