Will Stencyl be fit for my game

NerdinaNutshell

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I’m planning to be working on a pretty big game (I’m planning to put about 2 years of work into it), I seeing that someone said that Stencyl is only good for simple games. This kind of gotten me worried, I can’t code (duh) and I have a decent amount of experience with the engine. Do you think I should carry on with my project or should I find another engine that suits my needs? Please be honest, I’m not planning to completely ditch Stencyl.
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merrak

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There are plenty of examples of large-scale projects using Stencyl. But like with any large-scale project, a considerable amount of forethought on the code is needed to ensure it will run as intended.

One thing to note about Stencyl is that it makes it easier for novice programmers to get a game up and running. Beginner programmers don't usually have the expertise needed to write optimized code, do complex debugging, design efficient algorithms, that sort of thing. For a small-scale game, these things aren't important. Nobody will notice my bad code that runs one tenth as fast as my good code when the bad code is good enough to achieve 60 FPS. I think a lot of novice programmers hit a brick wall when their game gets large enough that these computational resource issues become important, but they haven't yet gained the experience to deal with them. At that point it's easy to get frustrated--especially if the problem seems unsolvable and all the development time wasted. That's one reason why "start small" is great advice.

There are a number of Stencyl "mega projects" chronicled in the forum (my own isometric engine, mdotedot's 3D extension, and Bombini's Space Pirate are the first three that come to my mind). These are multi-year endeavors. I think Space Pirate would win the award for longest running project, but my own project is in its fourth year.

My personal take on this: For a large project, you're unlikely to find a game engine that has every feature you'll need built in. Look for one that's close, but also look for one you can understand well enough to extend where you'll need it to. You're extremely unlikely to run into a problem that can't be solved--but the larger your project is, the more likely you'll eventually need to invest time into research to solve your problems. That will be the case regardless of what engine you use.

NerdinaNutshell

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You’ve got a point. I think after I finish my demo I’m going to spend a few months just sharpen my skills
Plot Twist... I'm a ghost

domagojbulat

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Make a small game within two weeks and publish to Newgrounds or Kongregate. If you get low ratings, it might indicate you are not ready for a big project yet. Read the reviews and improve the next small game or the remake.
One of the things that happens in long projects is that you improve in everything that you do. So, after one year of working on your game you will want to go back and improve the stuff you made early on. It will consume even more time if you do that, and if you don't, then the game won't look consistent. I believe it is better to work on long projects only after you are a bit more experienced game designer.

ceosol

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It really depends on what you consider simple vs. big. If your image assets are 50 MB each, Stencyl will have a tough time handling the importing - meaning you'll need some creative solutions to getting assets in. If you have one million smaller assets, that too could create a problem.

If you are talking about 100's of levels with the same actors and tilesets, no that is not a problem at all. Tons and tons of assets or gigantic file sizes are where Stencyl runs into issues, not with "big games" specifically.