Stencyl 3.4.0 is now out. Get it now!

Are you an educator? Introduce Yourself!

techkim

  • Posts: 1
Where are you from? Charlottesville, VA
What school or institution do you work for? Tech-Girls (http://tech-girls.org)
What do you teach? Video Game Design workshops
How did you find out about us? I'm a big Scratch fan and learned about Stencyl as a next step.
If applicable, tell us a bit about how you've used Stencyl in the classroom.
My curriculum resources are @ http://techkimgames.wikispaces.com

tinaoe

  • Posts: 10
I am a teacher that wishes to use Stencyl to create educational games for the classroom.  Has anyone done this?  Are there an educational games created with Stencyl out there? 

Photics

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  • Posts: 719
I am a teacher that wishes to use Stencyl to create educational games for the classroom.  Has anyone done this?  Are there an educational games created with Stencyl out there? 

Many different types of apps can be created with Stencyl.

In my textbook, I have lots of examples that were created with Tumult Hype, but the original examples were made with Stencyl or could easily be converted to Stencyl. (The examples would have been in Stencyl, but HTML5 exporting wasn't ready at the time of publishing.)

The pythagorean theorem, sine / cosine, tweening, attributes... lots of classroom type topics... can visualized with Stencyl.

Michael Garofalohttp://photics.com – Author of The Interactive Stencyl Textbook 8)

waxxo

  • Posts: 3
Hello everyone. I am a high school teacher considering using this software for a before/after school club.  I have only started using the software a few weeks ago and am going through the tutorials. My question is; about how much experience do you think is necessary in order to head up club? I am all about learning together and with them, but I feel I need to a decent grasp of the software. How experienced were you when you started using Stencyl with students?

Waxxo

kodingkingdom

  • Posts: 2
Hi there, I come from a education centre called Koding Kingdom (website: www.kodingkingdom.com) in Hong Kong. The centre aims to provide coding courses for kids aged 7-15. We have included Stencyl as one of our teaching curriculum, and currently running a Stencyl class for 4 children. It will be our pleasure if there are official support in Stencyl Education. Thanks and regards.

kdebruine

  • Posts: 3
Hi,
I am a high school computer science teacher in northwest Washington State. I have 12 years experience teaching programming in everything from VB.NET to C++ to Java and JavaScript.  I am looking for a tool that will help me capture the interest of my students and a tool that will remove many of the common obstacles of learning programming. 

I have experience using Scratch with middle school students. But I have my concerns of using a drag & drop block style interface with high school students.  Will it really help them understand programming concepts well enough, so that we can eventually move on to AP CS Java??  Is it too easy? 

I've run through the first two Stencyl Crash courses.  Very nice. Thanks for providing those.  You have a wonderful product that I'm sure will be very engaging for students.  I'll have to experiment and see if I can adequately teach the programming concepts at the level I need.

I am eager to see the Educator's Kit.  I have signed up for it on your website.  Thanks and have a GREAT day!!

Kris

Now I'm looking to buy the book - Learning Stencyl 3.x.   Does this book have actually working game code?  How many games are presented in the book?


Photics

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  • Posts: 719
I have experience using Scratch with middle school students. But I have my concerns of using a drag & drop block style interface with high school students.  Will it really help them understand programming concepts well enough, so that we can eventually move on to AP CS Java??  Is it too easy?

It's funny to me, but lots of programmers tend to not see GameSalad or Stencyl as real programming because a graphical user interface is in use. My thinking is that computers are tools and they should speak our language. By dragging the blocks around, students can learn programming concepts. They're actually programming, just doing it in a more modernized way.

The nice thing about Stencyl is that you can see the code. You can create your own blocks and use Haxe code to add more advanced features. Stencyl starts off easy, but the difficulty can be quite advanced. Stencyl becomes a bridge, a way to introduce beginners into more advanced programming.
Michael Garofalohttp://photics.com – Author of The Interactive Stencyl Textbook 8)

Innes

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  • Posts: 1963
I used to use ClickTeam's MultiMedia Fusion 2 (MMF2) to teach students aged 11-16 to develop games. MMF2 does not use blocks but, rather, one places check marks in a grid to (using Stencyl terminology) assign 'behaviors' to actors, etc.

In my view, programming skills are based on principles, rather than specific coding knowledge. Order, logic, planning, etc, are the skills that I was teaching. I wish that Stencyl had been available when I was teaching, not only because I could have used it for free, but because it is far more closely aligned to the coding that most people know.

As far as I am concerned, creating, for example, a repeat loop, or a while loop, requires exactly the same thought processes in Stencyl as it does in a 'traditional' programming language. Where Stencyl 'wins' (compared to 'traditional' coding) is that it relieves the student from the drudgery of technicalities such as how to make images appear on the screen. That differs for every programming language, which is why I think it's more important that they learn the 'logic' aspects of programming.

As far as the Learning Stencyl 3.x book is concerned, it shows how to develop a single game (a platformer), but in the process of doing so, it teaches a lot of the practicalities of creating any game with Stencyl such as creating actors, scoring, countdown timer bar, managing game over, etc. there is also a lot of detail about collision shapes for actors and tiles, etc.

It's definitely not a quick, point-and-click-here's-a-game kind of book.  I have found that books which show how to create numerous different games tend to miss (or skim over) a lot of vital issues, which leaves the reader wondering what to do now that they know how to create game 'X' or game 'Y'.

I would recommend the book for teachers, so that they can achieve a good understanding of how to create games, and will be more able to answer the kind of questions that students will ask, or for anyone else who needs more in-depth knowledge of using Stencyl. You can download a free sample chapter from www.TheStencylBook.com to get an idea of the style and detail.

There's a short review of the book by an educator called Clint Walters, at http://mrwaltersdesk.blogspot.com.au/2013/08/a-review-learning-stencyl-3x-game.html. Note that the references to Stencyl 2.x in the review are no longer relevant, as Stencyl 3.x is now on public release.

If you have any further questions about the book, please do ask.

Have you had a look at the Stencyl beginner's course that I have created on Udemy? You can currently access it for free using the link in the first post of the following discussion: http://community.stencyl.com/index.php/topic,35743.msg203623.html
Visit www.TheStencylBook.com - the only published book for learning Stencyl.

merrak

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  • Posts: 1450
I've been on the forums for a while now, but I don't think I've ever introduced myself. I teach math at a university in eastern North Carolina, USA. I originally downloaded Stencyl just to fill some down time, making a couple of games . But, I quickly saw it could solve a problem I had.

I have a need for special-purpose mathematical courseware. The larger systems (Pearson's MyLab, Hawkes Learning Systems, etc) suit most of my needs, but from time to time I need something specialized. So why not write it myself?

My programming background is mostly in C, and all my experiences with high-level languages are mathematics-specific (such as Mathematica). Learning Haxe seemed a bit daunting, and I generally dislike object-oriented programming. Stencyl seemed great, since I could use it to easily manage the interface and cross-platform compiling side. Most courseware tools out there are locked to one or two platforms (web, PC, etc.), but my own tools could be pushed out to just about any platform I'd like. Not bad!

But there's no (that I'm aware of) math support at all. Essentially, I needed to write a simple computer algebra system. Now that I'm doing all this work, I realized I could package everything as behaviors and make it easy for other educators to create their own simple mathematics courseware tools.

So, that's what I'm working on. I'm not finished with the toolset, but I have enough put together that I can make a few simple apps. For example, using a handful of behaviors, I was able to create this simple graphing calculator: http://www.stencyl.com/game/play/28857



My original goal was to create interactive presentations for use in an online math course. But now that I've had to start learning Haxe anyway (funny how that works out), I might as well complete an entire toolset.

kdebruine

  • Posts: 3
Hi,
My name is Kris DeBruine. I am the Computer Science teacher at Burlington-Edison High School in northwest Washington State. I am excited to use Stencyl in my classroom.  I've already gone through the first two Crash Course tutorials with my students and I am looking for the next step.

Jon

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  • Posts: 17510
Please contact us using the link at the bottom of the page, and we can set up you up with an early copy of the upcoming Educator's Kit.

chrisagon

  • Posts: 2
Where are you from ?
I am from France, I live near PARIS,

What school or institution do you work for?
I have founded the "club des Brickodeurs". We are hosted by the Forum Education Science Culture, which is a local non profit organization.

What do you teach?
We learn to program to kids with SCRATCH for the Coding Section, and LEGO Mindstorms for the robotics section.

How did you find out about us?
We are searching a more powerful software than Scratch but which is more or less easier to Scratch because kids are not fluent in English. We have the ambition to make game on phones and tablets : Scratch Don't but Stencyl Does.

If applicable, tell us a bit about how you've used Stencyl in the classroom.
Actually we don't use Stencyl. We have to translate in french the educator kit.

Gallicus

  • Posts: 9
Where are you from?
New Zealand.

What school or institution do you work for?
A local Primary School (Ages 5-12).

What do you teach?
Technology.

How did you find out about us?
Surfing the web for ideas.

If applicable, tell us a bit about how you've used Stencyl in the classroom.
I'm running a programme for the first time this year taking the students through an 8 session series that is designed to leave them with a basic platformer game they can take home and improve on should they wish.

sdmcgee

  • Posts: 2
I am interested in using Stencyl for my middle school club, but it is not very user friendly, do you have any suggestions?

letmethink

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  • Posts: 2527
...but it is not very user friendly, do you have any suggestions?
What makes you say this?
~Letmethink