Why is art so hard?

twotimingpete

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  • Posts: 1667
I started drawing in about 2006. I became obsessed with comics and webcomics, one in particular, Alpha Shade. I thought about it, I fancied myself as having some good creative/artistic instincts, and decided -- if he can do it, why can't I?

So I got a tablet, and just kept trying to copy. Kept analyzing other peoples' art (particularly Alpha Shade, which had a very layered look that caught my eye) and trying to copy it. I eventually developed my own style, but you can trace a lot of my process back to things I started figuring out while trying to copy Alpha-Shade.

In short, for me, learning wasn't so much about books. I mean, yeah, I have a few instructional books, including some burne hogarthe ones. Good stuff, but, really, I never got much out of trying to *read* things that taught me how to draw. I just had to copy. Copy, try, experiment, try, try, try. Copy. Try. Copy try.

The tablet I got, in 2006, was a Wacom Intuos3, 6x11. I'm still using it, but it's falling apart, and the shortcut buttons are almost all completely worn out. I'm down to 2, and one of those barely works anymore. :) I sooo need a new one.

mbuist

  • Posts: 252
Was just looking at your site. Nice work. I have just started it to learn. Basicly I want to draw cartoon style. Do you have any site your using for tutorial or any other tips or websites to explore
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As a final touch.. GOD created the Dutch

alex pang

  • Posts: 168
here, an image of a cat i found on google, i resized it and reduced its colors.
You see your proportions are incorrect. fix them first they are often the most important.
Then you should reduce your colors, use 4 colors to start with, 1 black 2 dark gray 3 light gray 4 very light gray (or white but it isnt recommended since its a cat)
also make the light come from the top (or somewhere else but top is the easiest) not center. (use it as a rule of thumb)
When you done everything I will help you but not before you've latest tried.
Hope it helps

Vigilence

  • Posts: 62
You see your proportions are incorrect.

Proportions are indeed very important, but only when trying to draw something realistically.  When it comes to character design, the shapes that are used for the character can represent a lot.

Take for example the first image in this link: http://kristenwoo.blogspot.com/2012/10/character-design-and-film.html

lazyboygames

  • Posts: 485
FillerGames...

If you try hard and draw everyday you will eventually make something half decent that you can be proud of. Just relax and take your time. And remember to always


alex pang

  • Posts: 168
You see your proportions are incorrect.

Proportions are indeed very important, but only when trying to draw something realistically.  When it comes to character design, the shapes that are used for the character can represent a lot.

Take for example the first image in this link: http://kristenwoo.blogspot.com/2012/10/character-design-and-film.html
unrealistic proportions, are exaggeration of realistic ones. Just read some books on the subject, I recommend the book series called "FORCE".
It explains how they use realistic poses of models (people and animals) to make cartoon like characters.
But this aside, not being able to do something realistic because of you style is just an excuse. You should be able to do both.

QwertyB

  • Posts: 52
Remember that it (supposedly) takes 10,000 hours to master any one thing.
If, like me, you're only trying to make art assets as something to go into your game then you're spreading that practice time across two separate crafts. Art is at least half making sure you're looking properly at what you want to do, and like Vigilence said, proportion/realism isn't necessarily what you're going for, but then again if you have a style it should be consistent. Here are two contemporary examples of games with cartoony/stylised art; Castle Crashers and Team Fortress. Team Fortress characters are cartoony, but also, because it's a (3D) FPS, they need (and have) very distinct character outlines (Valve are good at this; it is also an important thing in comic book character design, where artists might be limited in texture detail or number of colours). In Castle Crashers, the playable characters are identifyiable by colour; if you look closely you'll notice that all the characters have the same proportions; the heads are roughly the same size or bigger than the bodies, the foreheads are bigger than the face. It's good to have distinct looking characters but a cohesive style is also a noble target.


There's some good resources re; tiling here; it can't hurt to read a bit, especially seeing as these sort of tutorials tell you what to *look* for in good art before you start trying to make your own.

http://pixel-zone.rpgdx.net/shtml/tutmini-grass.shtml

Photon

  • Posts: 2697
But this aside, not being able to do something realistic because of you style is just an excuse. You should be able to do both.
That's kind of like saying, "If you want to be good at art, you have to be a master of every single art style there is." Some people are better at cartoon art, some at realistic, etc. Not being good at a particular style of art doesn't mean you are being a lousy artist.
Do NOT PM me your questions, because I likely will not respond. If I have replied to your question on the forum, keep using that topic. Thanks!

twotimingpete

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  • Posts: 1667
But this aside, not being able to do something realistic because of you style is just an excuse. You should be able to do both.
That's kind of like saying, "If you want to be good at art, you have to be a master of every single art style there is." Some people are better at cartoon art, some at realistic, etc. Not being good at a particular style of art doesn't mean you are being a lousy artist.

I actually agree that if you want to better yourself and be a proficient illustrator you need to learn how to draw humans with good, generally realistic, proportions. that's sort of the basics, you build outward from that, if you aren't building that foundation of knowledge you'll be limited. If being a good artist isn't your first concern then do whatever works. But if you want to better yourself I think it's important to learn the general shapes and sizes of things in the human anatomy, at least generally, and be able to draw them.

Photon

  • Posts: 2697
But this aside, not being able to do something realistic because of you style is just an excuse. You should be able to do both.
That's kind of like saying, "If you want to be good at art, you have to be a master of every single art style there is." Some people are better at cartoon art, some at realistic, etc. Not being good at a particular style of art doesn't mean you are being a lousy artist.

I actually agree that if you want to better yourself and be a proficient illustrator you need to learn how to draw humans with good, generally realistic, proportions. that's sort of the basics, you build outward from that, if you aren't building that foundation of knowledge you'll be limited. If being a good artist isn't your first concern then do whatever works. But if you want to better yourself I think it's important to learn the general shapes and sizes of things in the human anatomy, at least generally, and be able to draw them.
Yes, that makes sense. The point I was trying to make was that you can have a specific style, but I might of made it sound like you could bypass the basics, which certainly is not the case.
Do NOT PM me your questions, because I likely will not respond. If I have replied to your question on the forum, keep using that topic. Thanks!

Keep following tutorials, try copying reference pictures and do it every day - that's the only way to get better.

As for the style/method just focus on a style that inspires you and physically create by whatever method feels natural. I like vector art but can't do pixel art to save my life. My method is somewhere in between the other posters here; I sketch with a cheep Bamboo Wacom tablet, Live Trace it in Illustrator and then tweak the living daylights out of it to get the look I want.

Stick with it and you'll get there, art is not that hard.


twotimingpete

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  • Posts: 1667


Stick with it and you'll get there, art is not that hard.

For me it's always been pretty hard. Maybe I'm differently-abled.

Photon

  • Posts: 2697
I think it depends on what one defines as "hard".
Do NOT PM me your questions, because I likely will not respond. If I have replied to your question on the forum, keep using that topic. Thanks!

QwertyB

  • Posts: 52
Regarding the OP's specific art; I really don't like those sorts of gradients. That might just be a taste thing but I know a lot of people feel the same and they just always look like some sort of pre-set. They're the fake lens flare of the 2D game art world.

iojukking

  • Posts: 2
if you want a better program instead of pencyl i would suggest using gimp its a really good program,
Hope i could help! :)