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Stencyl vs Unity 3D

Donni11

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  • Posts: 2174
Hi everyone one I don't mean to be trolling just I have one quick question which I don't think would be appropriate for
"Ask a question " because it is not really Stencyl related .
What is harder Stencyl or Unity 3D or are they the same ?
Thank you to whoever answers  :)

« Last Edit: November 30, 2014, 11:23:45 am by Donni11 »
The Stencyl Discord Channel , Where the real Stencyl work happens ;).

SadiQ

  • Posts: 1725
What's harder for some people is easier for others. I don´t think unity is THAT hard compared to stencyl...it's probably a steeper learning curve thou(I haven´t tried unity). Once you learn the program the hardest thing with "coding" is simple logic.
Proud member of the League of Idiotic Stencylers! Doing things in Stencyl that probably shouldn't be done.

Hectate

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  • Posts: 4643
From my experience they are very similar in difficulty, although very different in implementation. The big challenge is that Unity has to deal with the third dimension and that can really get confusing in code.
:
:
Patience is a Virtue,
But Haste is my Life.
Proud member of the League of Idiotic Stencylers; doing things in Stencyl that probably shouldn't be done.

ceosol

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  • Posts: 2132
Both unity and unreal can run 2d games. One thing you have to be aware of in Unity, the asset store. There are many free assets, but to really make a game, you need to construct your own. Texture and bump mapping 3d objects can be cumbersome. The other part is that you need to design a 3d landscape to run the game on. That requires even more texture and bump mapping of 3d object. The alternative is running only 2d games... but I believe that Stencyl is just as powerful in 2d and costs less. If you only want 2d, go with Stencyl.

I got a free trial license of unreal from the indies vs pewdiepie jam. I have only spent minimal time on unity, but have now spent a few days on unreal. If unity is anything like unreal, it is crazy hard to program. If you wanted to make a game that is worth while, you would absolutely need a team of designers working with you. Otherwise, it would take you a few years to finish the project (assuming you even know how to design 3d terrain). The thing most people in unreal or unity opt for is buying assets and code in the asset stores. I don't have the money to do that right now, so its all going by hand :)

Shown below is what I've been working on. There is this spaghetti graph for block assembly in unreal. It is not so dissimilar to stencyl. However, for something to happen, you have to make a 3d movie of a single object and then have it triggered by the player in the game. I am going to get an unreal license at some point, but stencyl is much easier to grasp. From what I have heard, unreal is slightly easier than unity, but the asset store does not have as much in it.

Donni11

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  • Posts: 2174
Thank you everyone for the answers, and as it looks Stencyl is easier than Unity 3D
Cheers :) .   
The Stencyl Discord Channel , Where the real Stencyl work happens ;).

Meestar

  • Posts: 652
Yes, Unity requires quite a bit more effort than Stencyl does, especially when it comes to making 2D games.  It requires you to use either Unityscript, C#, or Bool to program your games, actual programming languages.  3D games require even more work, as you have to figure out how to work in 3D space with quaternions and 3D vectors.  I've had about 2 years of experience with Unity and 3 with Stencyl.  Once you feel that you have mastered Stencyl and think that you can create anything you think of, then I would suggest giving Unity a shot.  But again, you have to use an actual programming language.

Example Unity Code in C#:

String name ;
int id;
int speed = 20;
Vector3 waypoint;

GameObject[] players;

void OnStart()
{
   players = GameObject.FindGameObjectsWithTag("Player");
   for (int i = 0; i < players.Length; i++)
   {
           players.id = i+1;
           players.name = "Player "  + (i+1);
   }
}

void OnUpdate()
{
    if (transform.position <= Vector3.Distance(transform.position, waypoint)
          wander();
    else
         transform.position += Vector3.Forward * Time.deltaTime;
}

void wander()
{
    waypoint = Random.insideUnitSphere*47;

    RaycastHit hit;
    Vector3 direction = Vector3.down;
    direction.y = 1000;
   if (Physics.Raycast(waypoint, direction, hit)
   {
           waypoint += hit.transform;
   } 
}
PM me if you require help.  I'm always glad to help out!

Hectate

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  • Posts: 4643
Given the insinuation that Stencyl doesn't use an "actual" programming language, I like to clarify it as Unity uses a classic, typed language (and all the syntax that it requires) while Stencyl uses a visual programming language as the front-end to a classic, typed language (which is also fully accessible). :)
:
:
Patience is a Virtue,
But Haste is my Life.
Proud member of the League of Idiotic Stencylers; doing things in Stencyl that probably shouldn't be done.

Meestar

  • Posts: 652
Given the insinuation that Stencyl doesn't use an "actual" programming language, I like to clarify it as Unity uses a classic, typed language (and all the syntax that it requires) while Stencyl uses a visual programming language as the front-end to a classic, typed language (which is also fully accessible). :)

Lol, sorry Hectate.  Didn't mean to imply that Stencyl doesn't use an actual programming language because it does.  I meant to say exactly what you said, Unity relies on typing versus visual block coding (although there are extensions are available for Unity that allow you to use block coding).
PM me if you require help.  I'm always glad to help out!

Stevetheipad

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I have friends who think of unity as a real programming language and Stencyl as a kids one. I strongly disagree but wasn't sure how to reply.

rob1221

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Point them to the Ghost Song thread.

Stevetheipad

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They'd probably point out that you can create something good with anything. In general they think they are above blocks and think it's cheating. I tell them you can still work with code but it eliminates a hassle, they don't agree.

Jon

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What matters is that you're solving problems using computers. Whether you do it through a traditional language vs. a visual one doesn't matter. You're still going through the same thought processes no matter what language you work in.

It's not "cheating" because you're just working at a higher level of abstraction. The higher you go, the more approachable it becomes. The lower you go, the more efficient and hands on you can get.

More and more people (including major universities and school systems) are starting to recognize the benefits of learning these fundamentals through a visual language versus a traditional one.

Alexin

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If anything, Stencyl should be praised for providing an intuitive visual language and a traditional one, for novices and experts alike. In fact, you can mix both and build new APIs with custom blocks!

A simple exercise: searching for images with the keywords "stencyl programming language", or similar, and compare the amount of screenshots showing blocks versus Haxe. I think it's easy to infer why many "outsiders" think of Stencyl's programming as a kid's one.

Another one: search for images of "stencyl" and "unity 3d" and compare the user interface of both. If I'd want to be a "coder", then Unity seems more professional and looks like 3ds Max, and everyone knows this one is for pros. Plus it has 3D in it!

Everyone judges a book by its cover. (I know I do it)

« Last Edit: December 02, 2014, 08:26:21 am by Alexin »
"Find the fun"
alexin@stencyl.com

Innes

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  • Posts: 1963
What matters is that you're solving problems using computers. Whether you do it through a traditional language vs. a visual one doesn't matter...

...It's not "cheating" because you're just working at a higher level of abstraction. The higher you go, the more approachable it becomes. The lower you go, the more efficient and hands on you can get.

Hear, hear! It's solving the problem that is important, not the language used.

If people want to get sniffy about using a visual language as opposed to a language that requires code to be typed, then perhaps they can explain why they are not coding in assembler or machine code.
Visit www.TheStencylBook.com - the only published book for learning Stencyl.

ceosol

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  • Posts: 2132
99% of the games created in Unity look like something you could also create of Stencyl - at least from what I've seen. I mentioned it in my above post, when I choose to do 3D programming, I will be using the Unreal engine. I've seen much higher quality things being produced in Unreal than in Unity. And Unreal uses a click and drag block system similar to Stencyl. Does that mean that Unreal is not a real interface (no pun intended)? Does that mean that Unreal is just for kids? If you look for developer jobs, I bet you would find a lot more jobs requiring knowledge of Unreal than you would requiring Unity experience... and it has an interface that's similar to Stencyl.