WRASSLING iOS and Android (Best New Games feature on iOS!)

Max Finch

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  • Posts: 2187
Lol Max GLockling, I guess  ::)

The challenge is what drew me in, but now it kind of gets on my nerves.

Keep working, success is most often not instant. Do it for the fun of it.

choppedupmonkey

  • Posts: 604
Lol Max GLockling, I guess  ::)

The challenge is what drew me in, but now it kind of gets on my nerves.

Keep working, success is most often not instant. Do it for the fun of it.

Thanks for the advice man ;)
My name is Jason, I live in America, and I am 18 years old

"Focus more on the product than profit, for the profit will come after the product." -Me

elimoraless

  • Posts: 39
Hello! Cungrats!! I have a question how did you do to make the app so famous on sush a short time? any suggest? are you famous people? hahah i wish my game was tried by more people

rrzl

  • Posts: 242
I think Super Meat Boy only that super successful fast, because of the exposure from the film,
and because of that it garners a big fan base, bigger than what they have from their flash games.
Don't get me wrong, its a great game. But without the film, it probably would just only sold 1/3,
and B.O.I would have a hard time too, and probably wouldn't even exist.
In my opinion, IGF, festivals or events don't actually have much real impact to the outside world (outside gaming industry and fellow developers).

Max Finch

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  • Posts: 2187
Hello! Cungrats!! I have a question how did you do to make the app so famous on sush a short time? any suggest? are you famous people? hahah i wish my game was tried by more people

It's all about marketing. Follow people on Twitter, make contacts, and most importantly be passionate about games!

I think Super Meat Boy only that super successful fast, because of the exposure from the film,
and because of that it garners a big fan base, bigger than what they have from their flash games.
Don't get me wrong, its a great game. But without the film, it probably would just only sold 1/3,
and B.O.I would have a hard time too, and probably wouldn't even exist.
In my opinion, IGF, festivals or events don't actually have much real impact to the outside world (outside gaming industry and fellow developers).

That and maybe the fact that it was launched on Xbox 360's home page. It also has some of the most to the t controls I've ever used.

irock

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  • Posts: 2899
I think Super Meat Boy only that super successful fast, because of the exposure from the film,
and because of that it garners a big fan base, bigger than what they have from their flash games.
Don't get me wrong, its a great game. But without the film, it probably would just only sold 1/3,
Super Meat Boy had sold over one million copies before the movie even premiered, half a year before the movie's release

and B.O.I would have a hard time too, and probably wouldn't even exist.
The Binding of Isaac outsold Super Meat Boy despite not being featured in the movie

That and maybe the fact that it was launched on Xbox 360's home page.
the Steam version sold better than the 360 version

luck is clearly a factor when it comes to being successful, but luck can be overcome. if you roll 20 dice one time, your chances of getting a 120 are slim, but if you spend the next hour rolling those dice, you're probably going to get it quite a few times

each video game is a roll of the dice, bringing you closer to finally rolling a 120

Edmund probably wouldn't have been in IG:TM if he hadn't been rolling dice for a decade, improving as a game designer and making connections through his work over time

Edmund McMillen didn't get lucky: he eliminated the need for luck through persistence

Max Finch

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  • Posts: 2187
I think now more than ever it's not as much luck as it is connections, marketing, and game quality. Maybe back when game deving wasn't as popular it was a bit more luck, but at this point it's all about getting your high quality game known.

If you just upload your game to steam, apple, google, amazon, etc and *hope* you make a million bucks then you're kidding yourself. Unless you're Dong Nguyen, in which case this is the website for you: http://car-configurator.ferrari.com/488gtb

irock

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  • Posts: 2899
I'd say that it's harder than ever to be successful as a game developer. the reason for that is because game development is so popular now. it used to be much easier to stand out in the crowd because the crowd was much smaller. now everybody and their dog's making video games

so with more game developers and games, you have a lower probability of success

so with a lower probability of success, luck is more of a factor

so with luck being more of a factor, you have to work harder to increase your odds

so yes, connections, marketing and game quality are more of a factor now, but that's because luck is more of a factor now. you need those things now more than ever

rrzl

  • Posts: 242
Quote
Super Meat Boy had sold over one million copies before the movie even premiered, half a year before the movie's release

My estimation it sold 2/3 more because of the movie exposure probably not far off.
Without it, the hype of the game from the store front of Steam/Xbox probably already died off.
Steam/Xbox doesn't put one game on the front page more than couple of weeks, unless you are a big name.
The game already 2 years old at the time. The movie, re-kindle the hype back.

Quote
The Binding of Isaac outsold Super Meat Boy despite not being featured in the movie

The 1st main reason it doing well than Super Meat Boy, because it was cheap on release, just 5 bucks.
Thats pretty rare at the time on Steam a full price thats only 4.99.
And it probably receive even more exposure few months later after the movie is out, because they are then well known.

Personally I don't believe in luck. What i believe is, he make the right decision at the right time.

rrzl

  • Posts: 242
Game development has been popular for more than 30 decades. Its not just suddenly becomes popular.
Its already have. What different before and now, is because, its easier now to sell your game digitally,
and receive the money.

I've done a few game development in the late 90s and early millennial but only for myself, not commercially,
cause there is no way to charge people and receive the money. (I'm not from the US or EU)

When Sony announce they are opening up to the indies on PS Vita thru Playstation Mobile,
I thought, finally, I'm able to release commercially. I registered, and was actually accepted.
But here's the catch, my country is not listed. (Eh.. what?)
Of course PSM is now dead.

Well, all that are now history.

The market is now much more open to developer around the world.
Way more easier now to sell your game, and be able to receive the payment compare to back then.

That I think is mainly the reason why we see an influx of developers.

thechaosengine

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  • Posts: 329
Well this became an interesting conversation.

Luck, networking, and Making A Good Game are the ingredients you need, but it's not like you have a ton of control over any of those things (even the networking aspect is a skill in and of itself).

Wrassling is A Good Game in the sense that people enjoy playing it.
Wrassling was lucky in the sense that people enjoy SHARING it. There's no way we could've foreseen that happening.
Wrassling had a decent amount of networking going on, though nothing huge. I'm fairly known in the indie scene- I'm not famous but I know the indie cabal and shit, through having given talks at GDC, being active on twitter, and having a relationship with game journalists from previous projects.

We don't know anyone at Apple so the feature was something we didn't know about until it actually happened. When Wrassling was released, there really wasn't that much media coverage, it was largely players / word of mouth, and the fact that Wrassling is good LP material.

Another thing about Wrassling is the user reviews are REALLY positive. They're actually so over the top that now people are starting to think the reviews are false, we made them up, or that people are being sarcastic (I can assure you we didn't write a single review ourselves). And I don't know why that happened, I can't explain it. It might be that Wrassling is a good game and people want to share it, it might be luck. It's probably not networking but who knows.   

The point is, there's no telling (imo) HOW this happened. We had those factors I mentioned above, and so far it's working out in our favour, but I have no idea how we could've forced or influenced any of these things. Let me put it this way: I now think that Wrassling is a game that could go viral, based on the word of mouth spread and all that stuff, but I don't recall thinking that before we released it, at all. Colburt187 might have different ideas though, idk!


Game development has been popular for more than 30 decades.
lol

Also, rrzl, I think you're super wrong about McMillen's success. IG:TM wasn't a hollywood blockbuster. McMillen's had game industry clout for years, there's no way any of his projects could've failed. From the moment he started working on Isaac he's had publisher interest from everyone who matters.

I'm bringing that up since it's an interesting contrast from everything I just said about Wrassling, because in McMillen's case, the luck element had very little to do with it, that success comes from the other 2 factors: making a good game and having connections.

colburt187

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  • Posts: 2416
Wrassling is now at around 250K downloads, which is awesome, Our Previous game Golf is Hard is just under 100K. Hopefully the update that adds local multiplayer to the game will get the downloads going again, they have dropped to around 1,500 per day.

I think the number one factor in Wrasslings success is that is pretty different from anything else out there that I have seen and that its stupid, simple fun.

I do remember Folmer and i having a discussion about if Wrassling would be a main stream hit or an obscure little indie cult game. I always had the feeling that if we could get the game in the hands of a wide range of people most would atleast think it was weird and funny. I guess you could say it has been a bit of a main stream hit, the twitter messages have been very interesting. I've had a 30 something female graphic designer message me to say thanks for making a game that makes here happy every day, a game reviewer on pocketgamer saying it was one of his games of the year, 13 year old dude e-mailing to say its his favourite game and a long list of things he wants added to the game. It really seems to resinate with a lot of people.

There have also been a few haters, one guy on google play accusing us of writing all 300 of the reviews which around 20% were in Portuguese.

choppedupmonkey

  • Posts: 604
It is an awesome game. Did u guys do any advertising?
My name is Jason, I live in America, and I am 18 years old

"Focus more on the product than profit, for the profit will come after the product." -Me

thechaosengine

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  • Posts: 329
We didn't do any advertising no. I don't think anyone should invest in advertising until you hit a certain (read: huge) level of mainstream success.

choppedupmonkey

  • Posts: 604
Wow! SO the game just has to be (read this: THAT) good to get 250k downloads! haha
My name is Jason, I live in America, and I am 18 years old

"Focus more on the product than profit, for the profit will come after the product." -Me