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Merrak's Isometric Adventures -- Inventory

merrak

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  • Posts: 1238
I finally replaced the room system used in the original Temple of Idosra. In the original game, each room was a fixed 12x12x4 tiles size, which was the easiest to implement in a 10-day span. The new system lets me "paint" sectors.

Here is an example which duplicates the original game, with one exception.


The room one to the right of the lower-left corner has been split into two sectors, allowing the camera to move behind the wall. I made a little video showing some of the gameplay, including the split room (it has a staircase in it)

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/YxxSNgngjgw" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/YxxSNgngjgw</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YxxSNgngjgw

The sector map will let me design more intricate levels--the kind I really envisioned, like the one in this older post

I also made some updates to the UI. I'm not sure if I want to have no indication whatsoever of enemy HP and damage numbers, use just numbers, or keep the MUD-like text output that overlays the view.

Bombini

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  • Posts: 722

merrak

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  • Posts: 1238
Levels are coming along nicely :)

Tiled is a useful tool, but I'm still thinking that I'll need to make my own in-game editor in order to set up switches, doors, chests, and other interactive elements in the levels.

Attached are a couple of levels as they look in the editor and in-game. I'm also working on making some new tiles so that the rooms have more variety. I'm taking some inspiration from Frank Lloyd Wright's --A Fireproof House for $5,000--

merrak

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  • Posts: 1238
A couple of new additions--

The core functionality of the inventory system is complete, and I'm slowly adding object actions. One of the first items I made is an oil lamp you can use to look around in dark areas. Of course, you'll have to find oil. Here's a short video showing it all in action.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/edXXuo9v4lg" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/edXXuo9v4lg</a>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=edXXuo9v4lg

One thing I'd like to do is give the player the option to use objects in ways they weren't intended, such as throwing the (lit) oil lamp at a monster. The fireball would deliver a lot of damage--but destroy the lamp.

So this brings up the possibility of the player rendering the game unbeatable. I had the idea of determining the latest save point at which the game was still winnable, and resetting the player to that point (instead of the last save point) when they die.

One way to do that would be to make a graph of all the elements that are required to beat the game, and which ones depend on others. (e.g. you need the red key to open the door that hides the blue key). I can then run A* to determine if a "path" to the game's goal still exists.

For "Temple of Idosra", I can create this graph by hand. For a game using random dungeon generation, algorithms that use graphs (such as lock and keys) provide the necessities to figure out how far back the player will need to be sent.