Mini Monster Maker - First Game

Mebbs

  • Posts: 19
Really enjoying the images you've been uploading, seems like a very interesting game concept. Mind if I ask what your paint set up is? I'm always curious about how others like to generate game art

best,

gurigraphics

  • Posts: 688
Cool. I too walked bmx and skate.

It is important to remember here #Game dev insights 008
"One of the things that I tell my game design students all the time is that:
the best game that you're gonna make is the game that only you can make".
(Casey O'Donnell)

So one tip is to start with your target audience. What experiences they seek?

So, look for examples of more successful:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asWCMcADE1A
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MSoi6v4zLHk

What they seek are there. Now the question is: You can offer something better or different of this? You can do something of equal or higher quality? If no, you are far away from have some success with this and hardly people will talk about this your game. And what you can get is just learning.

And this brings us to Insight 006 - "How get the maximum possible with the minimum possible?".

Anyway, there is no right and wrong here. But what we have more or less motivation and what works better or worse.


merrak

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  • Posts: 2526
I never really liked 3D animation as much as traditional animation in movies. One time I was watching the 1967 Disney "The Jungle Book", and it hit me just how detailed the backgrounds were, and how (relatively) simple the characters were. Take a look at this image. Mowgli has about 3 unique colors--compare that to the background. I never noticed it as a kid--only after I started digital painting.

I had wondered for a while how viable that approach would work for animation in a game. This technique may fit pretty well with your particular art background (and mine-- although you're far more advanced than I am :P )

ceosol

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  • Posts: 2263
I had wondered for a while how viable that approach would work for animation in a game. This technique may fit pretty well with your particular art background (and mine-- although you're far more advanced than I am :P )

The key would be lighting and contrast matching. Mowgli's three colors automatically means he will not have the same contrast as the detailed background. If you always keep the light perspective the same for both character and background, you could definitely have 3D animation on a still background.

LadyLala

  • Posts: 38
And what you can get is just learning.

This is my only goal, at the moment. To learn how to make games, all kinds of games. Until I understand how they function, how to create them, then thinking about a successful game is premature.

My self-teaching method is usually:
1. Decide I'm going to learn something
2. Create small, easy projects based on what I want to learn, and do them
3. Make a ton of mistakes and learn from them
4. Use my new knowledge to make something good (finally).

I have taught myself many things this way, and it continues to be the easiest way for me to quickly absorb massive amounts of data.

So, please bear in mind that the first goal for my first few games will be simply to make them work, and understand how they work. Then, I'll decide what type of game I'm actually going to make (for the one I try to make for everyone else, not just for learning).

I had wondered for a while how viable that approach would work for animation in a game. This technique may fit pretty well with your particular art background (and mine-- although you're far more advanced than I am :P )

I have always loved Disney animation too. I think plenty of games utilitze a hand-drawn 2D art style already - I don't think that it's impossible - that's why I'm teaching myself how to do it! I think it would be quite fun to make a few little games with hand-drawn animation sequences and character movements.

I know for sure that many 2D games (and even some 3D games, on certain screens/areas) have hand-drawn background art (you can tell it's hand-drawn), and some of it is quite nice!

gurigraphics

  • Posts: 688
I also did it. And always learned more than used what learned. And I realized that you do not need much knowledge to make a good game. If, instead of starting with what you want, start with what the audience wants.

merrak exhibited a good solution. Using a simple character and invest in detailed backgrounds that you have more experience than most here.

But, if it not interests you, so I will not bother.

LadyLala

  • Posts: 38
But, if it not interests you, so I will not bother.

Oh don't say that! It does interest me! In fact, I have been doing a lot of art deco style work lately, and you guys have inspired me to try that type of style for a game UI. It's unique to say the least!

Don't worry - as far as games go, I think everything is interesting, even if I personally might not pursue it right away.

Besides, it's these conversations with peers that help solidify direction and goals; even if it's learning what I don't want to do - that's still helpful to know!