ProcJam 2016 (Nov 5 - Nov 12 UTC)

Hectate

  • *
  • Posts: 4645
ProcJam is a jam about Procedural Generation; making stuff that makes other stuff. I enjoy this kind of stuff and encourage other people to learn more about it too!

www.procjam.com
https://itch.io/jam/procjam
ProcJam 2016 Talks (YouTube)

Note that the start and end times are pretty much just a guideline and everything else is pretty flexible too. From the official page:
Quote
You can start early, or finish late. The dates are there really as guidelines to let you know when other people will be jamming. Some people can only work on weekends, some people can only take an evening here or there. Last year I spent four weekends instead of jamming through the official days. Do what works for you - let us know if you need a late submission code.
If you think it's a PROCJAM entry, it is. Don't worry if it's a game, or if it's really art, or if it's 'proper' procedural generation (that doesn't exist). If you made something and want to share it with us, please submit it!

The organizers of the jam set up a channel on Discord.
You can join here:
https://discordapp.com/invite/BHd7ndk
https://itch.io/jam/procjam/topic/45445/procjam-slack-discord

« Last Edit: November 01, 2016, 08:55:29 am by Hectate »
:
:
Patience is a Virtue,
But Haste is my Life.
Proud member of the League of Idiotic Stencylers; doing things in Stencyl that probably shouldn't be done.

colburt187

  • *
  • Posts: 2416
What would be an example of a game using Procedural Generation?

merrak

  • *
  • Posts: 2598
What would be an example of a game using Procedural Generation?

Rogue is a classic example.

colburt187

  • *
  • Posts: 2416
Ah ofcourse, my favorite game NuclearThrone is procedurally generated I believe.

Hectate

  • *
  • Posts: 4645
Yes, exactly. Procedural Generation would be where you code something that decides placement, features, properties, etc. of things in the game instead of hand-crafting them.

Rogue or NuclearThrone both generate levels procedurally, and that's where most people see the use. No Man's Sky, of course, generates a great many things procedurally.
Spelunky generates the levels procedurally, but interestingly they're based off of templates which the game modifies. This is an example of mixing procedural and hand-crafted content. The Binding Of Isaac or Enter The Gungeon are similar in that rooms are handcrafted, but the placement is procedural.
For more subtle uses though, you could do things that are not immediately apparent to the player. For example, if you reduce the difficulty of a level (lowering all enemies' health, perhaps) if it seems the player is having difficulty in beating it, you've just created a procedural (and adaptive) difficulty generator for your game.
:
:
Patience is a Virtue,
But Haste is my Life.
Proud member of the League of Idiotic Stencylers; doing things in Stencyl that probably shouldn't be done.

Hectate

  • *
  • Posts: 4645
I created this earlier to share in Discord so I'm posting it here for it's relevance. This is a simplification of the lock/key game design (frequently used Zelda games) for the purposes of level generation.

:
:
Patience is a Virtue,
But Haste is my Life.
Proud member of the League of Idiotic Stencylers; doing things in Stencyl that probably shouldn't be done.

merrak

  • *
  • Posts: 2598
I created this earlier to share in Discord so I'm posting it here for it's relevance. This is a simplification of the lock/key game design (frequently used Zelda games) for the purposes of level generation.
http://i.imgur.com/HbhA6HW.png

I've been meaning to play with that algorithm for a while. This may be a good opportunity to experiment with it. Handcrafting hundreds of rooms one at a time is such a pain :P

I liked the idea of taking a genetic algorithms approach--generate levels based off of a set of parameters ("chromosomes"). Harder levels would be created by assigning a high mate probability to levels the player has difficulty beating. Unfortunately, I don't think it would work well unless I had some sort of server that multiple players could contribute data to. I don't think data from just one player would be enough.

Hectate

  • *
  • Posts: 4645
I've been meaning to play with that algorithm for a while. This may be a good opportunity to experiment with it. Handcrafting hundreds of rooms one at a time is such a pain :P
Notably, the description assumes nothing about the actual content of the room. You could create a generator to fill the rooms with whatever is needed, or hand-craft room templates to match every possible scenario and just slot them in to the appropriate points. The main point here is to ensure that progress is gated with key/locks of some kind (actual keys, bombs, tools, etc), and that the player is able to (eventually) path through the level to the goal (by not putting a key behind it's lock!).

Quote
I liked the idea of taking a genetic algorithms approach--generate levels based off of a set of parameters ("chromosomes"). Harder levels would be created by assigning a high mate probability to levels the player has difficulty beating. Unfortunately, I don't think it would work well unless I had some sort of server that multiple players could contribute data to. I don't think data from just one player would be enough.
Yeah, doing "fitness" tests can be trained and are very interesting. It reminds me of the game Warning Forever; each time you beat the boss it adapts to your technique used. That's the primary challenge, in fact, adapting to the boss' adaptations.
You have to be careful about that also though, as the players that train the algorithm are the ones that it will cater to. My daughters have a very different playing style and skill level than I do, for example.
:
:
Patience is a Virtue,
But Haste is my Life.
Proud member of the League of Idiotic Stencylers; doing things in Stencyl that probably shouldn't be done.

merrak

  • *
  • Posts: 2598
I had worked on a game early in the summer that had a two-step process: Divide the overland into sectors (using something like lock/key to place monsters), then fill each room with forest paths. I got as far as getting the exits from one room to another to line up, which was a bit of a challenge.

The hard part seems to be making interesting rooms. Forest paths get pretty old.

I just thought about your last point concerning how different players would train the generation algorithm, and realized that the idea might work better for a single-player game with lots of small, quick levels... something like Angry Birds with hundreds of screens. In fact, I think Angry Birds 2 uses templates to generate different levels, but I think it just pulls random structures from a pool.

I haven't done much with my own physics/block game. It'd be neat to explore generating random landscapes and structures. My game had increasingly tough enemies introduced as the player progressed, which would complicate training the generator to make more difficult structures.

gurigraphics

  • Posts: 689
My favorite game with procedural generation is Terraria.

About AI, I was seeing there in the blog. Terraria has more than 100 types of AI to NPCs.
http://terraria.gamepedia.com/AI

Quote
I liked the idea of taking a genetic algorithms approach--generate levels based off of a set of parameters ("chromosomes").

This is a interesting example of Machine Learning
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P7XHzqZjXQs

I enrolled in a Coursera course about this. But the part of mathematics I could not follow. So, I gave up. ^^

I like experimenting with these complex things. The problem that I start but not finish anything. I'm always in a hurry to advance. And not master the basics. Nor organize the project right. And get lost in the confusion. kkk


« Last Edit: October 30, 2016, 04:08:16 pm by gurigraphics »

Donni11

  • *
  • Posts: 2182
Peace

Hectate

  • *
  • Posts: 4645
Thanks for sharing Donni; I hadn't noticed that.
:
:
Patience is a Virtue,
But Haste is my Life.
Proud member of the League of Idiotic Stencylers; doing things in Stencyl that probably shouldn't be done.

Hectate

  • *
  • Posts: 4645
Just a reminder for everyone; this "begins" in about 10 hours.

Of course, as noted; times are flexible for submissions too.
:
:
Patience is a Virtue,
But Haste is my Life.
Proud member of the League of Idiotic Stencylers; doing things in Stencyl that probably shouldn't be done.